From popcorn to candy, St. Sebastian science fair ‘in good taste’ moon science fair for homeschool

From popcorn to candy, St. Sebastian science fair 'in good taste'

From popcorn to candy, St. Sebastian science fair ‘in good taste’

Subscribe Contact Us Advertise With Us

77°
Partly Cloudy
Search…
News
Sports
Death Notices
Opinion
Lifestyles
Blogs
Jobs
Classifieds
Marketplace
Reader Services
Subscribe

Home News
News
PREV
PREVIOUS
Pregnant woman hit by SUV after fight at Burger King in Dearborn Heights
Pregnant woman hit by SUV after fight at Burger King in Dear…
The Dearborn Heights Police Department has a person of inter…

NEXT
NEXT UP
Boldly go to the “Star Trek: Exploring New Worlds” exhibit at The Henry Ford
Boldly go to the “Star Trek: Exploring New Worlds” exhibit a…
There was so much Cathy Dunow-Semran enjoyed about the “Star…

From popcorn to candy, St. Sebastian science fair ‘in good taste’
By Sue Suchyta For The Press & Guide Jan 29, 2019 Comments
Facebook
Twitter
Email

Facebook
Twitter
Email
Print
Save
From the brand of popcorn with the most popped kernels to the dyes that create candy colors, the winners of St. Sebastian’s middle school science fair were in good taste.

First place went to seventh grader Maria Makki, who looked at which popcorn brand had the fewest unpopped kernels, while second place went to seventh grader Bradley Johnson, who examined the “five-second rule” to see what types of food pick up the most bacteria when dropped on the floor. Third place winner Emily Garbarino, an eighth grader, used chromatography on candy to see if different dyes are used to make green M&Ms and green Skittles.

The science fair is part of St. Sebastian Catholic School’s celebration of Catholic Schools Week, which runs Jan. 27 to Feb. 2 as a nationwide event to showcase students, teachers and schools.

Principal Kathleen Johnson said each year, the middle school students learn about the scientific method, pick a topic to research, come up with a hypothesis and report on their conclusions.

“It is always interesting to find out who wins because it is not always those kids that you think are going to win,” she said. “We have outside judges, so there is no bias. So they look strictly at the project and its scientific merit.”

Johnson said it was wonderful to see the students put their projects together and display both their scientific and art skills. She said the experimentation and the creation of the display boards are done outside of school on their own time.

She said the ability to search for science fair ideas online gives students the chance to discover projects they may not have thought of on their own.

“It definitely gives them an opportunity to ‘think outside of the box,’” Johnson said. “The excitement of putting everything together and seeing their project come to life gets them excited about science in general.”

She said this year, the judges interviewed each student who entered, asking them about their project.

“Instead of just looking at the projects, they were able to talk to each student individually,” Johnson said. “They got some insight into what the children learned and why things may not have gone how they thought they were going to go.”

Makki, 12, of Dearborn, said she got the idea for her project because when microwave popcorn made in the classroom doesn’t thoroughly pop, there is less of it to share.

She took 100 kernels from each brand, timed how long it took them to start popping and counted how many unpopped kernels remained.

“The Orville Redenbacher brand popped slower than the Target brand,” Makki said, adding she was surprised that the less expensive brand performed better.

Her brother, Ismail Makki, 17, said that while he was surprised that she won first place, he is proud of her, and likes her project and its details. He said he remembers doing a science fair project at her age that focused on the factors that impact the flight of a thrown football.

Teacher Amy Castelli, who teaches seventh and eighth grade, as well as science to the fifth and sixth grade, said she thought her students’ science fair project ideas this year were creative and original.

“We had one girl who did beehives and pollination of tomato plants; we had chromatography, which uses chemistry; we had some solar environmental science work; so we have a whole array of different things going on,” she said. “I tell my students back in October to find something that you love, something that you are curious about, that you wonder why or how this works.”

Castelli said one student who saw a polygraph used on a television show wondered if it really works, so he looked into that, while another student wondered if the “five-second rule” for dropped food had any validity.

“His little sister is always picking up and eating it, so he wondered how sanitary that was,” she said. “So that was interesting.”

She said the student used Petri dishes and agar, which forms a gel when mixed with water and is a good medium for growing bacteria. The student dropped different types of food – dry, sticky and wet – on the floor, then cultured it to see what bacteria developed.

Castelli said hands-on learning is a positive way to interest students in science.

“That is what I do in my science lab – the hands-on is key,” she said. “They love to see and do. They do the scientific method. They do a hypothesis. We test our theories and then we revisit our hypothesis in the conclusion.”

Dean Jarvis, a St. Sebastian graduate and now a Wayne State University student who student teaches at the school, said interviewing the students about their projects adds an extra dimension to the judging, because in addition to the write up on their display board, they were able to learn how well each student understood their project.

“It comes with practice – being a scientist,” he said. “It can be daunting sometimes, so it is better to let them explain it.”

As a former science fair winner at Cobo Hall in Detroit, who went on to compete at the next level, Jarvis said he remembers the nervousness the students feel.

He said he is pleased to see how well the projects relate to the basic scientific principles the students have learned in class.

“It was wonderful to see students learn from those things, and be curious about them and then take it to the next level,” Jarvis said.

Castelli said she was pleased, as well.

“I was really happy to see that they got some acknowledgment, feel good about themselves and they want to learn more about science,” Castelli said.

For more information about the school, go to saintsebastiancatholicschool.org.

Facebook
Twitter
Email
Print
Save
+4Photos: St. Sebastian science fair
MULTIMEDIA
Photos: St. Sebastian science fair
By Sue Suchyta For The Press & GuideJan 29, 2019
Comments
Sign up for our daily morning newsletter
STATE
Sign up for our daily morning newsletter
Jan 17, 2019
Click here and then look to the right side for the sign up to the morning newsletter for The News Herald, and you can get the top headlines de…

MORE INFORMATION
+5’Lawrence Girard Day’ declared in Dearborn Heights as longtime resident celebrates 100 years
‘Lawrence Girard Day’ declared in Dearborn Heights as longtime resident celebrates 100 years
Larry Girard celebrated a century Nov. 21 with a party, his offspring singing an original song about him and Dearborn Heights Mayor Dan Paletk…

Dennis Scanland named Dearborn’s Veteran of the Year
Monstrance gifted by St. Pope John Paul II to be used at Corpus Christi Mass in Dearborn Heights
Press & Guide front page from Feb. 3, 2019
Declining enrollment, demographic changes cause closure of St. Sebastian Catholic School
Tags
St. Sebastian Science Fair Popcorn Maria Makki Emily Garbarino Local News Candy

Super Boost WiFi Device Takes The US By Storm
This tiny device can double internet speeds & supercharge your Wi-Fi signal up to 300%.

Sponsored by SuperBoost WiFi
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
View Comments

SPONSORED CONTENT
Water Bottles That Do so Much More Than Hydrate.
By Walmart Walmart

Reach your hydration goals. Check out this American-made water bottle.

Submit Your News
We’re always interested in hearing about news in our community. Let us know what’s going on!

Most Popular
Articles
Woman threatens Family Dollar manager with gun during theft of Tide pods
Dress code woes plague multiple Dearborn schools at the end of the year
Pregnant woman hit by SUV after fight at Burger King in Dearborn Heights
Dearborn Heights staff responds to concerns regarding senior trip spending
Dearborn Heights man awoken to break-in
Hot Wheels Legends Tour to return to Dearborn
Window broken on Dearborn Heights’ woman’s vehicle
Dearborn Heights writer tackles the tire: Research reveals truth, myths
Dearborn Heights woman leaves stove on, sets kitchen on fire
Dearborn Heights establishes fund for retiree benefits

More Newspaper Ads
Newspaper Ads
Moran Buick GMC
Moran Buick GMC
Moran Buick GMC
Moran Buick GMC
DICK GENTHE CHEVROLET
DICK GENTHE CHEVROLET
SOUTHGATE FORD
SOUTHGATE FORD
SOUTHGATE FORD
SOUTHGATE FORD
SOUTHGATE FORD
SOUTHGATE FORD
Sound Hearing Inc
Sound Hearing Inc
FELDMAN
FELDMAN
FELDMAN
FELDMAN
GIBRALTAR SCHOOLS
GIBRALTAR SCHOOLS
Stocks

Market Data by TradingView

Sections
News
Sports
Death Notices
Opinion
Lifestyles
Blogs
Multimedia
Online Features
Services
MediaNews Group Advertising
Submission Forms
Classifieds
Marketplace
Calendar
Search
Weather

Contact Information
pressandguide.com
One Heritage Drive, Suite 100
Southgate, MI 48195
Phone: 1-734-246-0800
Email: jalley@pressandguide.com

© Copyright 2019 MediaNews Group, Inc.
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | ArbitrationPowered by BLOX Content Management System from TownNews.com.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *